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Gas exploration is a hot button election issue in the South East which some say is splitting once harmonious communities. Erin Jones, The Advertiser February 23, 2018 5:29pm

THE fight to protect the South-East’s crucial aquifers and “clean, green” reputation has turned physical, following the first flaring of gas from a controversial well near Penola. Beach Energy last week tested its Haselgrove-3 conventional gas well, 8km south of the town, after it discovered what could be a “large gas resource” in January. The […]

Unconventional gas is a small employer

In November 2015, The Australia Institute (TAI) stated:

The entire oil and gas industry in Australia employs 27,500 Australian workers, or less than a quarter of 1% of the Australian workforce,[1] considerably less than the retail hardware store Bunning’s, which employs 33,000.[2]

TAI Employment figures

[1] ABS (2013a). 6291.0.55.003 Labour Force, Australia, Detailed, Quarterly, September 2015, Australian Bureau of Statistics, Accessed 11/11/15, http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/6202.0

[2] Bunnings (2013). About Us: Who we are, Bunnings, viewed 21 November 2013, <http://www.bunnings.com.au/about-us>.

New Book; The Human and Environmental Costs of Fracking

New Book; The Human and Environmental Costs of Fracking (Praeger Press, 2015) is available. http://www.amazon.com/Human-Environmental-Impact-Fracking-Fracturing/dp/1440832595/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1427722884&sr=8-1&keywords=madelon+finkel 

Madelon Finkel says; “This is an important book discussing many different aspects of an important topic. Each of the authors is an expert in his/her field, and the material is all evidenced-based (no personal opinions permitted).

Natural gas and oil prices have plunged, but that does not mean that fracking has disappeared or isn’t an issue anymore. Quite the contrary. Much more needs to be done to understand the components of the fracking fluid, for example. Much more work must be done to figure out how to dispose of the fracking byproducts. Much more needs to be done to scientifically document the potential for harm both to human and animal health and the environment. But most importantly, the public needs to get an unbiased, evidenced-based discussion of the pros and the cons of this technology. This is not an anti-fracking book; this is a book that lays out the facts and lets the reader make up his or her mind about the potential benefits and limitations of hydraulic fracturing.”

 

 

SA State Mineral Royalties less than 3% and Oil and Gas under 9%

Royalties in SA

2012-2013

While Minerals production was 4.8 billion and Petroleum  production approx 1.1 billion

Minerals royalties paid to State : $107.5m only about 2.2% of production

Petroleum royalty $81.2 approx 8% of production

Total SA State royalties 2012/13: $188.7m

2013-2014

Mineral production 5.4 billion and Petroleum production 1.6 billion

Minerals royalties paid: $157.5m which is 2.9% of production

Petroleum royalty $133.9 is 8.3% of production

Total royalties 2013/14:  $291.4m

Information from DSD December 2014

Coal seam gas a ‘human rights’ issue – Farmer John Fenton radio interview

Coal seam gas a ‘human rights’ issue – click here for the Farmer John Fenton radio interview

john fenton

A Wyoming rancher turned anti-‘fracking’ activist says that Australia needs to reconsider its use of coal seam gas. John Fenton argues that the gas is unsafe and the process of drilling for it damages rural communities and the environment.

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